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Whether cyclists or motorists, deal with the 10 per cent

The city spent a fair bit of money a few years ago to put bike lanes on many city streets.

It’s just a shame that there are a fair number of cyclists who apparently didn’t get the word.

They still prefer to ride on the sidewalk, where they give themselves a better chance of running down pedestrians, or they use the bike lane, but on the wrong side of the road.

What I saw Monday, though, kind of takes the cake.

I was driving east on Fifth Avenue, crossing the highway to go downtown. A short distance ahead of me, a cyclist was doing the same, and continued down Fifth Avenue.

To do so, they had to ride right past a large sign with a picture of a bicycle in a circle with a red line through it, and directions for cyclists to use Eighth Avenue and not Fifth.

That, I can only assume, would have inconvenienced this cyclist. You know, little things like obeying the law can be so boring at times, especially when you’re on a bicycle and have received the impression over the past few years from the powers that be in the city that the laws only apply to drivers. Cyclists can do whatever they want.

That was bad enough, but this cyclist, proceeding illegally down Fifth Avenue, wasn’t even concerned about staying safely as far to the right as possible. No, they were riding right out in the middle of the right-hand lane, forcing vehicles catching up to them to have to move into the other lane to pass.

I know the vast majority of the cyclists in the city obey the rules of the road, and I salute them for that. However, when the bike lanes were being debated, I asked a few cyclists what percentage of drivers (approximately) caused problems for them. The usual answer was less than 10 per cent.

So we put these bike lanes in to cut down on a problem less than 10 per cent of drivers were causing.

When does the city start taking action against the fewer than 10 per cent of cyclists who are causing problems on the road?

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