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Frederick, Calogheros accept Governor General’s award

 

The Exploration Place CEO Tracy Calogheros (left) and Lheidli T'enneh Chief Dominick Frederick accept award from Governor General Julie Payette. Facebook photo
The Exploration Place CEO Tracy Calogheros (left) and Lheidli T’enneh Chief Dominick Frederick accept award from Governor General Julie Payette. Facebook photo

The Exploration Place Museum and Science Centre and the Lheidli T’enneh First Nation were presented with the 2017 Governor General’s History Award for Excellence in Community Programming yesterday.

Lheidli T’enneh Chief Dominic Frederick and The Exploration Place CEO Tracy Calogheros were in Ottawa to accept the award from Governor General Julie Payette.

“Well everybody, we did it!” Calogheros posted on The Exploration Place Facebook page. “The Governor General’s Awards are complete. What an honour! I’m so lucky to have such a wonderful job and so many great friends! Congratulations to the entire team at the Exploration Place, to Edith Frederick and Chief Frederick and all of the Lheidli T’enneh Nation. I am honoured by your trust and your friendship.”

The award is for Hodul’eh-a: A Place of Learning.

On June 21, 2017, the Exploration Place Museum and Science Centre and the Lheidli T’enneh First Nation entered into a historic partnership with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding. The agreement named the museum as the legal repository for Lheidli T’enneh materials, with the goal of repatriating collections held by other institutions and creating a central home for the nation’s cultural assets.

To mark this milestone in their longstanding partnership, the Exploration Place Museum and the Lheidli T’enneh opened a new permanent gallery called Hodul’eh-a — A Place of Learning. The museum and gallery is located within Lheidli T’enneh Memorial Park — the site of the traditional hunting grounds and village for the Lheidli T’enneh Nation. The gallery is a learning place for community members, with open programming space to allow for knowledge transfer, research, cultural expression, and healing. Hodul’eh-a – A Place of Learning serves as a model for how Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities can work together to reclaim traditional spaces, protect cultural assets and promote a greater understanding and respect for Indigenous history and experiences.

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