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More than 7,000 evacuees in Prince George

It’s been just over a week since wildfires started ravaging the Cariboo, sending evacuees to Prince George and Kamloops.

Today, there are just over 7,000 residents of the Cariboo who have registered as evacuees at the Emergency Reception Centre at the College of New Caledonia in Prince George. Nearly 590 people have registered to stay in lodging provided at CNC and the Charles Jago Northern Sport Centre at the University of Northern British Columbia. The remainder have found their own accommodations in local homes/properties or campgrounds, and 600 are in commercial accommodation.

Town Hall meetings

The next town hall meeting for evacuees will be on Saturday, July 15, at 8 p.m. Updates will be provided about the Cariboo wildfires and the local services available to evacuees. The town hall will be presented at the UNBC Canfor Theatre and simulcast to Room 1-306 in the College of New Caledonia, as well as to the Wolf Den in the Charles Jago Northern Sport Centre. Evacuees also have the opportunity to watch the town hall via live internet streaming: www.unbc.ca/livestream.

The town hall on Thursday night was the first to be livestreamed. There were more than 100 people in the three sites and another 426 watching the event online. The recording of the Thursday town hall is available at www.princegeorge.ca/caribooevacuation.

Volunteers

Volunteer PG continues to work with the city to identify and coordinate volunteers interested in assisting with the Cariboo Evacuation effort. In fact, since the Volunteer Centre opened on Thursday morning, more than 500 people have registered using the online form alone. Volunteers are continuing to be trained and assigned to various roles.

Transit and Transportation

A shuttle bus is operating between CNC and the Northern Sport Centre, connecting evacuees at both locations. Those wearing a wristband provided to all evacuees during registration are able to ride the shuttle bus for free; PG Transit buses are also free to evacuees.

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