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CNC, Lheidli T’enneh sign MOU

Lheidli T’enneh First Nation Chief Dominic Frederick and council members along with CNC President Henry Reiser at Lheidli T’enneh Memorial Park. CNC photo
Lheidli T’enneh First Nation Chief Dominic Frederick and council members along with CNC President Henry Reiser at Lheidli T’enneh Memorial Park. CNC photo

The College of New Caledonia signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Lheidli T’enneh First Nation Wednesday.

Called We Learn Together the MOU sets a strong foundation for a future working relationship that is based on principles of respect, communication, trust and understanding.

The intention of the agreement is to strengthen the relationship between both parties, and will help inform continued work on Indigenizing curriculum and student services at CNC. Principles set out in the MOU include building a co-operative, long-lasting and mutually beneficial relationship for the advancement of education and research-related goals.

“Over the past half-decade, we’ve learned to appreciate the Lheidli people’s ‘Way of Knowing’ and our college is enriched by this perspective,” said CNC President Henry Reiser, in a press release. “This MOU recognizes how we have learned together in the past – we celebrate this today and will continue to do so in the future.”

The agreement ties into CNC’s Strategic Plan for Promoting Student Success.  It is part of the school’s mandate to work in collaboration with Aboriginal communities to incorporate Aboriginal cultures throughout CNC campuses and programming.

“A key component of reconciliation is for CNC to recognize Lheidli T’enneh traditional territory as the site of our Prince George campus, which acknowledges their long history and culture which continues to influence and enrich our lives today,” said CNC Director of Aboriginal Education Marlene Erickson.  “We look forward to collaborative work with the Lheidli community in the future.”

CNC was one of six parties involved in signing an MOU during National Aboriginal Day celebrations at the Lheidli T’enneh Memorial Park in Prince George.

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