Rural dividend dollars handed out in North Victoria is distributing over $464,000 in new grants to help small communities develop projects to diversify and strengthen their economies. In the North, the  City of Dawson Creek, Dease River Development Corp., District of Houston, Kalum Quarry Ltd., Nak'azdli Whuten, and Treaty 8 Tribal Association will each receive $10,000. In the first intake of the three-year, $75-million BC Rural Dividend, 47 grants, totalling $464,294, will be awarded to 30 local governments, 15 First Nations and two not-for-profit organizations from around the province. WoodFibre LNG project gets EAO certificate The province has issued an environmental assessment certificate to FortisBC Energy Inc. for the Eagle Mountain-Woodfibre Gas Pipeline project. The decision was made after considering a review led by British Columbia’s Environmental Assessment Office. A record of the factors that the ministers considered in making their decision can be found in the Reasons for Ministers’ Decision at: http://tinyurl.com/zgspbf2 There are 30 conditions that are attached to the environmental assessment certificate. Design requirements are specified in a certified project description. Each of the conditions and the certified project description are legally- binding requirements that FortisBC Energy Inc. must meet to be in compliance with the environmental assessment certificate. Northern Health warns of algae on lakes A blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) bloom is suspected in various Northern BC lakes. Current lakes under the advisory include: Charlie Lake, Bednesti/Berman Lakes, Nulki Lake, West Lake. Blue-green algae can cause illness such as diarrhea, stomach cramps, eye and skin irritation. To prevent illness from blue-green algae, residents living near the shores of this lake, as well as visitors to this lake should make sure to: Never drink untreated water from lakes, ponds or wetlands. Boiling water or other methods of disinfection do not remove blue-green algae from the water. Never wade, swim or bathe in water with visible blooms. Never cook, or wash dishes in water heavily contaminated with blue-green algae. You can safely consume fish fillets from this lake but should limit your consumption of whole fish and trimmings as fish may store toxins in organs such as the brain, liver and intestines. Pets should avoid eating whole fish and trimmings. Never let pets or livestock into the water if there are blue-green algae. Provide them with other sources of drinking water.
Briefing Room
A pipeline project in northeast B.C. has been given the go-ahead, pending its proponent meeting 26 conditions set out by Victoria. The province has issued an environmental assessment certificate to Plateau Pipe Line Ltd., a subsidiary of Pembina, for the Northeast British Columbia Expansion project. The project is an approximately 147-kilometre long pipeline that will transport natural gas liquids, including condensate, propane, and butane, or other combinations of natural gas liquids. The proposed pipeline would run from northwest of Wonowon to an existing terminal near Taylor. The project will operate for a minimum of 25 years and have a transmission capacity of approximately 75,000 barrels per day (or 12,000 cubic metres per day). The decision was made after considering a review led by British Columbia’s Environmental Assessment Office. There are 26 conditions that are attached to the environmental assessment certificate. Design requirements are specified in a certified project description. Each of the conditions and the certified project description are legally-binding requirements that Plateau Pipe Line Ltd. must meet to be in compliance with the environmental assessment certificate. The certificate conditions were developed following consultation and input from Aboriginal groups, government agencies, local governments, communities and the public. Key conditions for the project require Plateau Pipe Line Ltd. to: •protect moose during construction by restricting activities near suitable habitat during the moose calving season; •undertake wetland surveys prior to starting construction to inform the development of a wetland management plan, and compensate for any permanent loss of wetlands or wetland function; •develop additional mitigation measures to protect fish and wildlife if construction activities are to take place outside of least- risk timing windows; •undertake surveys prior to starting construction and develop site-specific mitigation measures to help protect endangered plants and ecological communities; •develop site-specific mitigation measures to help protect old growth forest; •develop a plan for protecting heritage resources, including engaging with Aboriginal groups and training Aboriginal monitors to identify heritage values; and •hire an environmental monitor for the construction phase, with the authority to stop work if necessary to prevent or reduce adverse effects from the project. Plateau Pipe Line Ltd. incorporated a number of features into the project design to avoid or reduce adverse effects, including: locating approximately 90 per cent of the pipeline route parallel to previously disturbed areas; using  existing accommodation to house workers; constructing the project over a short time period, with clean-up and reclamation concluded within one year; constructing during times with the least amount of risk for affecting fish and wildlife whenever possible; and avoiding many designated areas and known sensitive areas, including old- growth management areas, parks and protected areas, and designated ungulate winter ranges. The project will require various federal, provincial and local government permits to proceed. The Environmental Assessment Office will co-ordinate compliance management efforts with other government agencies to ensure that the office is satisfied that the certificate conditions are met throughout the life of the project.
Plateau Pipeline gets EAO certificate