Assisted deaths to be reported to coroner The B.C. government has passed a regulation which requires that all deaths that are the result of medical assistance in dying (MAiD) be reported to the BC Coroners Service. Parliament last month changed federal legislation to permit medical assistance in dying in specific circumstances. The federal government has indicated it will work with the provinces and territories to develop regulations ensuring the consistent reporting of MAiD deaths across the country. The regulation passed by the cabinet will ensure that in the interim all such deaths in B.C. are reported to the BC Coroners Service. The role of the BC Coroners Service will be to ensure compliance with the federal and provincial laws and regulations, and also to gather information about MAiD deaths in B.C. for aggregate reporting purposes. The BC Coroners Service will work with the Ministry of Health to ensure all those involved are aware of the new requirements. Woman charged with second degree murder Charges have been laid in connection with the stabbing death of a Tachie man July 17. Provincial Crown Counsel has approved charges of second degree murder against 33-year-old Annie Jean Anatole in the stabbing death of a 31-year-old Tachie man. Anatole has been remanded in custody until her next court appearance on August 15. On July 17, at 2:11 a.m. the Fort ST James RCMP responded to a report of a stabbing on the Tl'azt'en Nation (Tachie) Reserve which is located approximately 65 km West of Fort St. James. The suspect was located and taken into police custody. Police say this was an isolated incident where the two individuals knew each other and the public is not at risk. Direction change for Connaught Hill traffic Operations have begun on Connaught Hill to reverse the flow of traffic. Currently, traffic moves clockwise around the loop at the top of the hill. Once operations are complete, traffic will turn right instead of left at the intersection and proceed in a counter-clockwise direction.  Last week, city crews installed new curbs at the intersection. Today, crews are paving a section of road in order to help facilitate the change. Directional signage have been installed and the change implemented immediately upon completion.  The change was suggested last year by a Prince George resident and, upon investigation, the City's Engineering Services division agreed that the clockwise direction was not only a sightseeing inconvenience for occupants in the passenger seats of vehicles, but also inconsistent with roundabout and traffic circle movement convention.
Briefing Room
Prince George could soon see a new transit and operations facility, thanks to federal and provincial funding announced Monday. Prince George MLAs Shirley Bond and Mike Morris, along with Mayor Lyn Hall were on hand for the announcement. Prince George's share of the $160 million funding announcement, means the addition of modern buses with improved technology including closed circuit TV to improve the safety of passengers and drivers, real-time information for accuracy and precision, and automatic passenger counters that will enable BC Transit to optimize service delivery based on gathered data. Prince George is also set to receive a boost to its transit infrastructure with a new and expanded Central Fraser Valley Transit operations and maintenance facility that will support a fleet of cleaner burning compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. The $23 million project will position Prince George to meet a growing demand for transit in addition to improving operational efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. "These investments will meet the growing transit needs in Prince George," said Mayor Lyn Hall, in a press release. "The new facility will support CNG buses which will benefit the environment and reduce operating costs." Prince George is also set to receive a boost to its transit infrastructure with a new and expanded Central Fraser Valley Transit operations and maintenance facility that will support a fleet of cleaner burning compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. The $23 million project will position Prince George to meet a growing demand for transit in addition to improving operational efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The funding will also benefit the Prince George handyDART system, which is receiving two replacement handyDART buses in 2017. BC Transit will be working with the community and seniors groups in the community to ensure the 900 hours of handyDART service available in the city is fully used. This will mean reliable transportation for people who cannot use conventional transit.

Quick Facts

Federal funding of these projects comes from the new Public Transit Infrastructure Fund, part of Phase 1 of Investing in Canada that will provide over $10 billion in immediate investments to support public transit systems, green infrastructure projects, and social infrastructure projects. Details on Phase 2 of Investing in Canada will be announced over the next year. BC Transit will continue to work with local governments to identify additional projects for funding consideration. In partnership with local governments, BC Transit provides access to public transit to more than 1.6 million British Columbians in 130 communities outside Metro Vancouver. As a result of the Province's commitment to transit in B.C., communities with as few as 1,000 people have access to transit, making BC Transit a unique service for smaller communities anywhere in Canada. The province currently provides the highest level of operating funding, per capita, for transit in Canada.
Transit facility set for Prince George