Bodies from park interred: Frederick

Chief Dominic Frederick and Mayor Lyn Hall give update on new pavilion in Lheidli T'enneh Memorial Park. City of Prince George photo
Chief Dominic Frederick and Mayor Lyn Hall give update on new pavilion in Lheidli T’enneh Memorial Park. City of Prince George photo

Lheidli T’enneh Chief Dominic Frederick says all human remains that have ever been found within the Lheidli T’enneh Memorial Park, including those uncovered during excavation for a new pavilion, were recently interred in the Lheidli Cemetery within the park.

The decision was made by Lheidli Elders and the remains are now in “places of honour,” said Frederick.

In all, the complete remains of 12 bodies and a bone of another, were discovered in park when construction began last year on a new $800,000 pavilion. Now that the remains have been interred, the pavilion, which replaces an old picnic shelter can officially be opened.

Mayor Lyn Hall and Frederick provided an update on the Lheidli T’enneh Park Pavilion Thursday, one week prior to the June 21 opening.

Located between the playground and the spray park, the pavilion will host four days of activities and events next week, 
starting on National Indigenous Peoples Day (June 21), and continuing through to Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day (June 24). 
For further information about the events, please visit www.pavilion2018.ca.

From concept to completion, the pavilion has been a partnership between the city and Lheidli T’enneh.