RBC Foundation gives $50,000 to Northern Clinical Simulation Program

Spirit of the North Healthcare Foundation chair Colleen Sparrow, Tammy Hoefer, manager of simulation program, coordinator Michael Lundin, RBC VP Commercial Financial Services Sean Kehler, and local branch manager Tim Carmack with $50,000 for the Northern Clinical Simulation. Bill Phillips photo
Spirit of the North Healthcare Foundation chair Colleen Sparrow, Tammy Hoefer, manager of simulation program, coordinator Michael Lundin, RBC VP Commercial Financial Services Sean Kehler, and Tim Carmack, Region Vice-President B.C.Interior and North, with $50,000 for the Northern Clinical Simulation Program. Bill Phillips photo

BY BILL PHILLIPS

bill@pgdailynews.ca

If your baby or your child needs emergency life-saving care, you will want the health care professionals to have practices whatever procedure they’re undertaking.

That’s a given.

That’s where the Northern Clinical Simulation Program comes in. Health care professionals at the University Hospital of Northern B.C. have been training at the clinic since 2012.

The Northern Clinical Simulation Program is a collaboration between Northern Health, UNBC School of Nursing and the UBC Northern Medical Program.

“Each of those organizations received funding to incorporate simulation and education,” said Tammy Hoefer, regional manager for the program. “Through the natural collaborations in the North, conversations started happening about how we can maximize resources … those three organizations decided to pool the funding that they received for simulation.”

Now there are simulation centres in Prince George, Fort St. John, Terrace, and Quesnel, as well as mobile simulators that staff take around the region.

The simulations are designed to be as real as possible. Life-size baby mannequins can breath, cry, sweat, cough, bleed, vomit, urinate and, yes, go into cardiac arrest and/or stop breathing. Health care professionals get to practice life-saving techniques in an atmosphere that is very, very close to the real thing.

“We provide training across the North to nursing students, the majority of those being in their and fourth year,” she said.

Michael Lundin is the coordinator for the program.

“One of the great advantages the simulation gives is the opportunity to practice key cases that they wouldn’t see regularly in the clinical environment,” he said. “They get to practice really extreme cases … that gives them a lot more confidence and improves their competency.”

And the staff use the simulators a lot. And that means there is wear and tear.

“Most of the equipment was funded when the program first took off,” said Judy Neiser of the Spirit of the North Health Care Foundation. “The equipment is getting older.”

So the Foundation approached RBC and the RBC Foundation came through big time.

A $50,000 cheque was presented to the Foundation Thursday, which will, obviously, go a long way towards updating the equipment.