STEAM the topic of conversation at convention

It’s a big week at Exploration Place.

“We are excited beyond words to welcome the delegates and special guests coming from all corners of our nation (and even some coming from other countries) for the Canadian Association of Science Centres conference,” said CEO Tracy Calogheros in a news release. “They arrive (Wednesday) for three days of big fun and even bigger intellect.”

Prince George very rarely gets to host a national convention of any kind, so the staff is working hard to make the most of this auspicious occasion.

CASC is an organization at the leading edge of connecting the everyday public with the latest innovations in science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics.

“We call that family of topics STEAM, which is much more than an acronym, it envelopes how these fields of study power our culture and our economy, now and for the future,” said Calogheros. “This will be a three-day STEAM conversation led by some of the sharpest minds in the science sector.”

The convention will feature two keynote speakers.

Deanna Burgart is an Indigeneer, her word, which amalgamates her Aboriginal heritage and her scientific profession. She explores the way economy and ecology can coexist.  

Todd Boyette is coming from the United States, bringing the unique perspective of a professional science advocate in a culture that has empowered anti-science activists at high levels of American society. He will talk about how to counter that “science friction” with facts. 

“These are only two of the leading scientists and cultural change agents who will come to the discussion table in Prince George,”said Calogheros. “We are calling this rare gathering ‘Lhulh’Uts’Ut’En,’ the Dakelh words for ‘Working Together.'” 

This philosophy has been inscribed on the Exploration Place way of life, this past year, as it has become home to the artifacts and icons of the Lheidi T’enneh First Nation.

“It is an award-winning relationship that bows our head with humility but squares our shoulders for the important work that lies ahead, together. We get to show Canada what that looks like, as national “reconciliaction” leaders.”