Canada after Day 12 at PyeongChang

Cassie Sharpe after winning gold at PyeongChang. Canada Olympic Committee photo
Cassie Sharpe after winning gold at PyeongChang. Canada Olympic Committee photo



PYEONGCHANG (February 21, 2018) – Here is what you need to know about Team Canada at the end of Day 12 at the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018:

GOLD: 9 SILVER: 5 BRONZE: 7 TOTAL: 21

RESULTS: Team Canada’s competition results

COMPETITION SCHEDULE: Team Canada Day-By-Day at PyeongChang 2018

QUICK FACTS:

  • Brady Leman wins Canada’s first Olympic medal in men’s ski cross – the sport made its debut at Vancouver 2010;
  • With three Olympic medals, Kaillie Humphries has the most of any Canadian bobsleigh athlete;
  • Three-time Olympian Phylicia George, who competed at Rio 2016 and at London 2012, wins her first Olympic medal

FLASH QUOTES:

Kaillie HUMPHRIES

On winning bronze:

“I’m extremely happy right now. Each time I’ve been able to come to the Olympics and compete for Canada is a huge honour but to know that six months ago Phylicia (GEORGE) came in…We’ve worked extremely hard to be in this position (and) the competition was stiff.”

On how it compares to winning gold at the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games and at Sochi 2014:

“This is probably my most emotional medal, how hard we’ve worked, how much went into this medal and how much it means – and how great a person Phylicia is.”

Phylicia GEORGE

On winning bronze:

“I started bobsleigh six months ago so it’s been a lot of work. Kaillie has been an amazing mentor to me, I’ve had great coaches, great therapists so I’m just thankful to everybody who’s put themselves into me and the fact that we were able to come together and do this, I’m just really excited by it.”

Brady LEMAN

On becoming Olympic champion:

“It hasn’t really sunk in yet. It’s something I have been working so hard for, for 10-plus years now, especially the last four after coming fourth in Sochi. To battle back from that and stay strong and confident in myself is huge, and I’m just so proud right now.”

On his previous Olympic Games:

“This blows them out of the water. The other two were in a sense always disappointing. I broke my leg the day before competition in Vancouver and then just missing the podium in Sochi was kind of bittersweet. Fourth at the Games is a big accomplishment, but at the same time you’re the first guy who doesn’t get a medal. So it’s a tough one to swallow, but I’ve had such a great experience regardless of results at all my Games. This one I really tried to enjoy a little more and be part of the Olympic experience and I used that on race day.”

On overcoming adversity:

“I had a lot of support from my team around me. My family stuck with me through it all and some good results in between the Games always helps to fuel the fire and I just love the sport. I get to do what I love everyday. If it’s in the summer or winter I’m skiing or training, so that kind of makes it easy.”

On family support:

“They’ve always been right beside me or right behind me and they got me started in skiing, my parents, my sister, and they let me go away all the time and always have smiles and hugs and love no matter what happens. They’re super proud and I couldn’t be happier they were here.”

Kaetlyn OSMOND

On the short program:

“I just really wanted to enjoy my programme. I got to skate it in the team event and as much fun as I had it still wasn’t the enjoyment that I wanted. Today that was my goal, to have fun, enjoy it and to stay focused. I am very happy. That programme is exactly how I have been training it and to be able to have that much fun in my short programme means everything to me.”

On her personal best:

“It means so much I have been fighting to keep this programme and improving it at each event. I was a little upset after the team event short programme, but to come out here, not long afterwards and do this programme and do a personal best and season’s best it’s really important to me.”

Max PARROT

On qualifying first from heat 1:

“Qualifying first in my heat is really awesome because it means I’m going to be dropping in the last seeds of the final so I get to watch everybody’s runs before I do mine.”

On going for a difficult second jump despite scoring well in the first run:

“I already knew with my 89 (points) that I would go to the finals so no stress at all for the second one, I was just trying to make it better. Most of the guys rode pretty well and judges scored pretty well as well so I’m happy with how it went today.”

On overcoming fear in big air:

“I think (with) fear you can actually work on that, so everybody that has some fear you can through that and have no fear. I think it’s like that for any sports. I feel like I’m still young today but I’ve had some fears just trying quads in the past and I’ve been able to get through that so I think anyone can get through that no matter what the age.”