Snow has arrived so ‘let’s be careful out there’

Walking from home to the CFIS studio on Monday morning, I was surprised and amazed.

I was surprised by how well most of the vehicles I saw on the road were driving at a slightly slower pace to account for the snow, I was amazed some people figured they didn’t need their headlights on just because it was a dark and cloudy day with snow falling reasonably heavily. After all, it was 8 a.m. Who needs headlights?

I remember two days of snow in the past particularly well, one from Prince George and one from Kamloops.

I was working for the Free Press and, as usual, had gotten to the office very early in the morning. It had been snowing a bit, but it wasn’t bad when I got to the office.

Then it kept coming . . . and coming . . . and coming.

It was a day where I didn’t have to leave the office, and as the hours went by and the snow kept falling, I paid a few visits to the front window just to remind myself which of the white blobs in the parking lot was my car.

In Kamloops some years ago, it was also a day where I walked in to work. Again, the snow just kept coming all day.

My first hint that something was different came when I left the office and saw a city transit bus parked on our street. The transit route didn’t run on our street, but it did run up the hill to the Aberdeen Mall.

When I realized the bus hadn’t been able to make it up the hill, I figured this was a storm with a difference.

One of the other reporters offered me a ride home, and I accepted, even though I probably could have walked.

It normally took me about 40 minutes to walk home from the office.

That day, it was a 45-minute trip in my friend’s car, complete with a couple of near-collisions as cars slid slowly from one lane to another going down the Columbia Street hill.

As the snow is probably here for the next little while, keep in mind the words of Sgt. Phil Esterhaus on the TV show Hill Street Blues:

“Let’s be careful out there.”

  • My wish is for every driver to be able to keep their vehicle centered in their own lane. We all see the yellow dividing line on curves because not everyone
    knows to keep their vehicle centered. People either fear they’re going too fast and can’t make it in their own lane so they cross the centerline, or they’re just
    plain lousy at driving. A lot to wish for, I know.