Former player now helps Timberwolves as physiotherapist

 

There is a familiar face on the Timberwolves sidelines this year. Tyson Williams, who played for the UNBC Men’s soccer team, is now a physiotherapist, and is helping the TWolves stay healthy and competitive.

“As a player, you always want to be on the field, and sometimes I find it hard to not sign up for some courses and play. But I really enjoy trying to keep the players on the field, and being involved in the action from a different point of view.”
The 26-year-old graduated from Manchester Metropolitan University in England in 2015, but points to his time as a UNBC athlete as crucial in his understanding the ins and outs of sport.

“I can relate in several ways. I can understand what they’re going though as athletes, whether it be physically or psychologically. I’m sure we went through many of the same things.”
Williams played with the Timberwolves from 2008 until 2011. When he was a student-athlete, an interaction with Accelerated Physiotherapy’s Davis Rodrigues was critical in his career decision. Rodrigues has been working with the TWolves for many years and Williams says he learns from his boss on a daily basis.
“I had the epiphany on his treatment table. He put the bug in my ear to do it. Davis is an extremely important asset. He has dealt with sports injuries his whole career, so he really knows what to look for, and knows how to manage student-athletes extremely well.”
While he looks right at home in his job, Williams was no slouch on the pitch, either. He stands first all-time in goals scored by a Timberwolf at the BCCAA/PacWest level, while sitting fourth all-time in games played.
“I didn’t have a clue of the stat. As a holding midfielder, it wasn’t usually my job to go up and score goals, but I managed to score a few, which I am proud of. We had a great squad, back in the day, and we still keep in touch.”
Williams does have two years of eligibility remaining, but says it’s unlikely those are ever used. He’s proud of his career as a Timberwolf, and it’s the interaction with the current student-athletes that make his job so enjoyable.
“They’re all really friendly, and they keep me on my toes. A lot of the guys are pretty cheeky and like to throw around locker-room banter, which I a lot of fun. I get to know them more personally, as well, which is really nice.”
-UNBC
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